Files

Download

Download Full Text (404 KB)

Description

Jonathan Edwards towered over his contemporaries--a man over six feet tall and a figure of theological stature--but the reasons for his power have been a matter of dispute. Edwards on the Will offers a persuasive explanation. In 1753, after seven years of personal trials, which included dismissal from his Northampton church, Edwards submitted a treatise, Freedom of the Will, to Boston publishers. Its impact on Puritan society was profound. He had refused to be trapped either by a new Arminian scheme that seemed to make God impotent or by a Hobbesian natural determinism that made morality an illusion. He both reasserted the primacy of God's will and sought to reconcile freedom with necessity. In the process he shifted the focus from the community of duty to the freedom of the individual. Edwards died of smallpox in 1758 soon after becoming president of Princeton; as one obituary said, he was "a most rational . . . and exemplary Christian." Thereafter, for a century or more, all discussion of free will and on the church as an enclave of the pure in an impure society had to begin with Edwards. His disciples, the "New Divinity" men--principally Samuel Hopkins of Great Barrington and Joseph Bellamy of Bethlehem, Connecticut--set out to defend his thought. Ezra Stiles, president of Yale, tried to keep his influence off the Yale Corporation, but Edwards's ideas spread beyond New Haven and sparked the religious revivals of the next decades. In the end, old Calvinism returned to Yale in the form of Nathaniel William Taylor, the Boston Unitarians captured Harvard, and Edwards's troublesome ghost was laid to rest. The debate on human freedom versus necessity continued, but theologians no longer controlled it. In Edwards on the Will, Guelzo presents with clarity and force the story of these fascinating maneuverings for the soul of New England and of the emerging nation. [From the publisher]

ISBN

9781556357176

Publication Date

3-2008

Publisher

Wipf & Stock

City

Eugene, OR

Keywords

Jonathan Edwards, Great Awakening, religion, Protestantism, evangelical, individualism

Disciplines

Christianity | History | History of Christianity | History of Religion | Intellectual History | Religion

Department

Civil War Era Studies

Comments

Attached is the introduction to Dr. Allen C. Guelzo's book, Edwards on the Will: A Century of American Theological Debate.

Required Publisher's Statement

Original version is available from the publisher at: http://wipfandstock.com/edwards-on-the-will.html

Edwards on the Will: A Century of American Theological Debate

Share

COinS