Authors

Meagan A. Lupolt '16, Gettysburg College

Location

CUB Ballroom

Session

Poster Presentations

Start Time

4-29-2016 4:30 PM

End Time

4-29-2016 6:15 PM

Supervising Faculty Member

Kathy Berenson

Department

Psychology

Description

This study aimed to develop a valid and reliable scale to measure the phenomenon known in the media as “Penn Face”. The scale was simultaneously administered with established measures to gauge its association with personality constructs that were expected to be associated with it (or not). Given that this phenomenon has yet to be empirically investigated, research for scale development relied heavily on the media, internet blogs, and individual student accounts. The finalized measure elicited promising reliability and was correlated with a number of expected personality traits, especially: anxiety, depression, suicidal ideation and perfectionism. Our findings suggest that Penn Face is a measurable and potentially dangerous phenomenon that may exist within an undergraduate population.

Comments

This poster was presented at the Annual Research Symposium, 2016.

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Apr 29th, 4:30 PM Apr 29th, 6:15 PM

Unmasking Penn Face: Measuring the Phenomenon and Its Relationship to Other Personality Constructs

CUB Ballroom

This study aimed to develop a valid and reliable scale to measure the phenomenon known in the media as “Penn Face”. The scale was simultaneously administered with established measures to gauge its association with personality constructs that were expected to be associated with it (or not). Given that this phenomenon has yet to be empirically investigated, research for scale development relied heavily on the media, internet blogs, and individual student accounts. The finalized measure elicited promising reliability and was correlated with a number of expected personality traits, especially: anxiety, depression, suicidal ideation and perfectionism. Our findings suggest that Penn Face is a measurable and potentially dangerous phenomenon that may exist within an undergraduate population.