Authors

Kira J. Mason '16, Gettysburg College

Location

CUB Ballroom

Session

Poster Presentations

Start Time

4-29-2016 4:30 PM

End Time

4-29-2016 6:15 PM

Supervising Faculty Member

Christopher Barlett

Department

Psychology

Description

Most widely-accepted models for aggression do not explicitly address an important variable that roots in evolutionary psychology: the presence of a potential mate. The current research investigates whether the presence of an attractive or unattractive member of the opposite sex influences hypothetical aggression. Participants (N = 1035) imagined themselves in front of an attractive or non-attractive member of the opposite sex (accompanied by pictures of corresponding attractiveness levels), and indicate their aggressive intentions after a provocation, or not. Results from the 2(sex) x 2(attractiveness) ANOVA showed that males viewing an image of an attractive female aggressed more when provoked than males viewing a non-attractive female. These effects were absent for females.

Comments

Psychology Honors Research

 
Apr 29th, 4:30 PM Apr 29th, 6:15 PM

The Peacock Effect: The Influence of the Opposite Sex on Aggressive Behavior

CUB Ballroom

Most widely-accepted models for aggression do not explicitly address an important variable that roots in evolutionary psychology: the presence of a potential mate. The current research investigates whether the presence of an attractive or unattractive member of the opposite sex influences hypothetical aggression. Participants (N = 1035) imagined themselves in front of an attractive or non-attractive member of the opposite sex (accompanied by pictures of corresponding attractiveness levels), and indicate their aggressive intentions after a provocation, or not. Results from the 2(sex) x 2(attractiveness) ANOVA showed that males viewing an image of an attractive female aggressed more when provoked than males viewing a non-attractive female. These effects were absent for females.