Authors

Kimberly A. Longfellow '16, Gettysburg College

Location

Breidenbaugh 209

Session

German Studies Capstones II

Start Time

4-30-2016 10:30 AM

End Time

4-30-2016 11:45 AM

Supervising Faculty Member

Kerry Wallach

Department

German Studies

Description

The Roma and Sinti represent presence and absence in German culture. Although there has been a population of Roma and Sinti in Germany for centuries, they are often perceived by the German majority population as distinctly "eastern" and, as such, non-German. The perceptions of Roma by the German majority population mimic Orientalist assumptions, where the Roma are romanticized, criminalized, and generally devalued in comparison to Eurocentric narratives. Through an analysis of the Roma presence in German history, literature, and current events, one can see that the experience of the Roma in Germany is largely structured by the perceptions and assumptions of the dominant German population. These perceptions and assumptions shift depending on the needs, goals, and concerns of this dominant group.

Comments

German Studies Senior Capstone

 
Apr 30th, 10:30 AM Apr 30th, 11:45 AM

The Roma and Sinti in Germany: Orientalism and Exclusion from German Historical Narratives (Romantisiert, Kriminalisiert, und Abgewertet: Orientalismus und Narrative der Roma und Sinti in Deutschland)

Breidenbaugh 209

The Roma and Sinti represent presence and absence in German culture. Although there has been a population of Roma and Sinti in Germany for centuries, they are often perceived by the German majority population as distinctly "eastern" and, as such, non-German. The perceptions of Roma by the German majority population mimic Orientalist assumptions, where the Roma are romanticized, criminalized, and generally devalued in comparison to Eurocentric narratives. Through an analysis of the Roma presence in German history, literature, and current events, one can see that the experience of the Roma in Germany is largely structured by the perceptions and assumptions of the dominant German population. These perceptions and assumptions shift depending on the needs, goals, and concerns of this dominant group.